A further step has been taken in research on blindness

Japanese researchers have succeeded in the laboratory to obtain three-dimensional development of a draft retina from embryonic stem cells (ES cells) mice. It is, as pointed Science etAvenir, a complex structure like an eye during embryonic development. These works, which were published online 6 April by the journal Nature, came after the green light to U.S. clinical trial on the treatment of macular degeneration using cells from stem cells embryonic.

Japanese researchers have succeeded in the laboratory to obtain three-dimensional development of a draft retina from embryonic stem cells (ES cells) mice. It is, as pointed Science etAvenir, a complex structure like an eye during embryonic development. These works, which were published online 6 April by the journal Nature, came after the green light to U.S. clinical trial on the treatment of macular degeneration using cells from stem cells embryonic.

Two British specialists of the retina, Robin Ali and Jane Sowden, intervened in the journal Nature to welcome this unprecedented achievement, “Generating complex organs in vitro is a major challenge in regenerative medicine, but not insurmountable”. And researcher Olivier Goureau, Institute of Vision in Paris, said to AFP that the work “extremely innovative” in calling other “because there are still differences in eye level between humans and mice, particularly in photoreceptors”. The team behind this feat is headed by YoshikiSasai Center for Developmental Biology RIKEN Kobe, Japan.

Dr. Sasai says “mouse cells are organized in three dimensions to form a layered structure near the optic cup, training embryonic two walls giving rise to the retina.” For the Japanese scientists there is no doubt that this work will subsequently be used to advance research into diseases causing blindness, such as retinitis pigmentosa, “These will be cultured retinas can not be used for transplants, but at least they will help scientists better understand the development of the retina and its dysfunctions. In addition, they might be used for drug testing”.

Source photography: Radio-Canada / RIKEN Center

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